Category Archives: photography

Reflections

I found some truly beautiful photos shot by Tom Hussey the other day. Old people now and what they once were. The photos are part of his series “Mirrors” and tell the story of the quick passing of time, the memories of life and the inevitable death. At least that’s what they made me reflect upon. I though about my parents who are getting older every time I see them. Meaning, I can see that now. I didn’t really notice before.
Memento mori

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>The Photography of Joseph Szabo

>This is one of my favourite photos ever. I’d like to think she’s drawing her guns, not pulling up her pants…
I first discovered it when Dinosaur Jr used it as an album cover for the excellent album Green Mind (1991). The photographer is Joseph Szabo, a guy who spent 35 years taking pictures of teens at Malverene High School in New York where he worked as a teacher. This particular photo, Priscilla 1969, is shot at Jones Beach and Joe himself tells the story:

“The girl in the photo is a mystery and will ever remain so. One day as I was photographing at Jones Beach I saw “Priscilla” in front of me and my immediate reaction was to make a photo(s) before the moment changed. I took a few photos, looked down to rewind the film, and put in another roll. When I looked up she was gone! …but I had the photo and it is my most sought after image.”

It is featured in his book Almost Grown:
Almost Grown is a celebration of teen-age experience: the years of restless desire and blossoming sexuality; the world of high school, parking lots, and street corners; and the uniquely American culture in which all of us have grown up. It is a record in photographs and poetry that combines the talents of an adult photographer and a group of almost-adult poets who were asked to tell a picture’s story as their own. The result is an unusual collaboration between teacher and teenager, a funny and romantic look at teenagers looking at themselves. Theirs is a world rarely witnessed by parents. Here is what kids do together — at the beach of the drive-in, during and after school — what they themselves describe as “doing nothing” because it is neither work nor play.”

Here are some shots from Joe’s books Almost Grown, Teenage, Jones Beach and Rolling Stones Fans.













>Jean-Yves Lemoigne

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CLICK THE IMAGES TO ENLARGE






Jean-Yves Lemoigne’s photography is thought-provoking and surreal, almost in a Banksy kind of way. Even though these are commercial photos it seems like Lemoigne’s commercials are as interesting as his private shots. You’ll find a lot more photographs on his website, but I think it sucks with all the flash crap, so you might want to check this link instead.

Here’s a shot from a different series, a commercial for gardening tools.

>Funeral Fog VS Life Eternal

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Click the images to enlarge
The kids never give up…
Soccer training.

Another field, another team.

Yet another field.

Today was such a grey and misty day almost all photos turned out black & white. I thought I’d aptly add Mayhem’s brilliant Funeral Fog here, but I found the even more brilliant rehearsal version of Life Eternal instead, the one recorded May 16, 1992. I really like it this way, neither Dead nor Attila present, just voiceless…

>Graffiti and lamps

>Donna Brady’s urban photographs of her Brooklyn neighbourhood have been turned into a cool series of lamps, aptly entitled Hi-Light (“highlights” being a graffiti term). If you’re interested in buying, check out the Rare Device site (the shop is located in San Francisco).


Speaking of lamps and art, check out my friend Kicki Möller’s beautiful lamps Möllerlamporna at her website. All of them unique in different shapes and colours.

>Photo — Autumn Winter Transition

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I know it’s a bit tiresome with all those goddamn autumn photos flooding the internet this time of the year, but you’ve got to admit that most of them are stunningly beautiful.
I shot this one this Saturday after having swept some snow in Skärstad (where my parents live), so I guess it’ll have to symbolize the Autumn-Winter transition.
I like the odd angle. And no, it’s not upside down.